Month: July 2008

Mark Seymour, Damien Leith session jottings

Mark Seymour and Damien Leith kept a date with ABC North Coast in spite of the cancellation of the first day of the festival. Outside the room, a band of dedicated and determined people stepped up to save the waterlogged site. This is long for a blog post but what the heck. Seymour talked about the writing of Holy Grail and Throw Your Arms Around Me and other Hunters & Collectors hits. His book Thirteen Tonne Theory released this year is about life with H&C. “It was kind of a revolving door amongst the other personnel in the band. Once you start, you end up with sort of writing. And so you kind of had a huge human resource.” At one stage there were eight or nine and then it gradually got smaller, and then got bigger again. And we just had this particular arrangement. … But I’m still here” Damien Leith talked about songwriting after Australian Idol. He recently released his first novel, One More Time. “I’ve been a solo artist, so as far …

Can we see more subtext on the page?

The session Not So Funny with Tim Ferguson, Julian Morrow, Miriam Margolyes and chaired by Jacqueline Woodman was one of the funniest of any BBWF seen by this blogger. Another was Sandy Gandhi’s launch of her book Enlighten Up which filled the bar late Saturday evening. Delivering comedy requires confidence, says Margolyes, who told a story about how director Norman Lear suggested a round of Jewish jokes told from a ladder might be just the thing to spark up a Hollywood performance of her Dickens’ Women show. Julian Morrow answered the often asked question of late about where The Chaser team was during the Papal visited and suggested that it was not only up to them to subvert big events. He said the team was not like Batman to be called to any situation. Unbelievably and excusably perhaps because of a long stint overseas, the BBWF blogger was not familiar with the work of Tim Ferguson beyond vague memories of reading reviews of the Doug Anthony Allstars in Edinburgh years ago. Ferguson likened the processes …

Are blogs the antithesis of thought?

Bloganomics. The BBWF blogger sat in on the blogging session and was impressed by the care, diligence and courtesy of George Megalogenis in overseeing his blog Meganomics even to the point of correcting the worst of the spelling errors in comments if he has time. He says he does not sit on his blog all day yet he checks it morning, noon and night which is a significant commitment. He believes he is responsible for the comment on his blog and moderates. Mungo McCallum raised the point from the floor that as blogs become more prevalent people may be more likely to only ever Google their own prejudices in ever decreasing circles. Megalogenis said he wonders about what people will draw on as their primary source of news over the next 15-20 years as news sources become more fragmented. The BBWF blogger’s opinion: it depends on the person. People who don’t read critically, or are poor judges of the calibre of content will be the same whether they look to print, online, or TV. Some …

The divine accidents of creativity

The BBWF blogger is fascinated by author and academic Sue Woolfe’s pre-occupation with fragments, particularly how they are written down without any aim, or purpose, or over-arching theme or anything else. Woolfe looks at why fragments come together in a way that makes a book stylistically coherent. Is it a divine accident? Woolfe thinks creativity is much more creative than we think. Woolfe explores why ideas are not just cerebral but distillations of emotions. It seems to Woolfe as if ideas are emotionally coded in the brain and something late in the writing process triggers these emotions to come together and so the ideas come together which is something amazing. Her books The Mystery Of The Cleaning  Lady and Leaning Towards Infinity among others were selling fast at the festival bookshop. Marian Edmunds